"Act 5.", translation

"Act 5."
Translation of audio-text

 

 

(voice 1.)
A sister of my great grandfather was a poor peasant woman. She lost her husband in the 1st World War. She had one child who she brought up all by herself. Obviously I had never met her. But I did inherit something from her: an apron, a small apron. Which color it was originally is hard to say, maybe dark blue or black. Every time the apron got torn she repared the torn part with another tiny piece of fabric. Gradually the apron turned into a busy patchwork. It looks like a modern art work but in fact it is an evidence of poverty and misery.


My grandmother, my fatherʼs mother, was a seamstress. She had 6 children. They were very poor. She sewed clothes for her 6 children to protect them from the cold or to make them look pretty. She also had clients. They were rich ladies and had pretty clothes made by her. She also made clothes for us. She had 8 grandchildren. For me she once made a school uniform, dark blue with a red collar. I was very proud of this garment. Later on when we were grown ups and didnʼt want to wear selfmade clothes any more (a symbol of poverty) or we had enough money to buy our own clothes, she bought herself two dolls. She made pretty clothes for her dolls, even leather jackets and leather boots for the winter.


(voice 2.)
My grandmother sewed too. She made embroiderded copies of large paintings. Tapestry. I remember that she had many many different color threads. Every time she started a new pattern she took a new color. When the work was finished she framed her pieces and decorated her home with them. She had them all over her house. She kept embroidering as long as she could, as long as her eyesight and her hands permitted her to do so. When she got too old and made mistakes in her work she was very disappointed.


(voice 1.)
My motherʼs mother was the wife of a village doctor. She went to a seamstress to have her dresses made but she did love embroidery. A couple of times per week some other women from the village came to her house and they worked together. They embroidered pillowcases, sheets, tablecloths, wall tapestry. I still have some of these pieces in my closet: way too pretty to use and way too useless too. They often used only 2 colors, red and black.


(voice 2.)
My mother, she sews dolls. These dolls are entirely made of fabric and they are stuffed with wool. Every week she goes to the “Doll Club”, itʼs called the “Doll Club”, and she makes dolls there together with 7-8 other women. Every time a new baby is born in the family he or she gets one of these dolls. The doll is laid in the cradle and gets a name. She wonʼt embroirder a face, only the eyes, so the little baby can decide the mood of the doll himself.


(voice 1.)
When my parents were to get married they didnʼt have money to buy a wedding dress. So they decided to make one themselves. They went out to buy a large piece of white fabric, silk or satin or some other pretty fabric. My father made a drawing of the dress on a large white sheet. He was an excellent draftsman. My mother made a pattern based on the drawing. They cut it out and then they began to sew. They worked for 3 days and 3 nights, just like in a fairytale, and on the morning of the wedding the dress was ready. And on that day they sew their lives together and later on this attachment was sometimes  too tight and suffocating.